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Humans of Rangel: Underclassmen Edition

Ashton Bryson, Reporter

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“When I was in the fourth grade, my optometrist decided I was responsible enough to get contacts. I had been wearing glasses since the first grade and had proven my maturity by never breaking them, losing them, or scratching them. So, on one glorious afternoon, I walked into the doctor’s office with glasses, and out with contacts.It was the weirdest feeling in the world. I had never been able to see clearly without those big lenses sitting on top of my nose. I was invincible. I felt prettier. My smile was bigger. My nose was free to do whatever a nose should do. It was perfect, until I had to take them out later that night. I couldn’t quite grasp the idea of touching my eye and removing this tiny lens. I had gone to the bathroom and washed my hands, just like the doctor told me to. I dried my hands off and went up to take it out when all of a sudden I froze. I could not believe I thought I could handle this. I completely freaked out and called my mom, a woman with perfect vision who had no experience with contacts whatsoever, into the bathroom to help me out. I told her my predicament and she then proceeded to ask me how I thought I could wear contacts if I couldn’t take them out. I did not have a good answer to that question, and I still don’t. After what felt like hours and hours of her poking at my eye trying to pinch this tiny contact, she finally got them out. It was definitely a bonding experience.”

-Maya Budhrani

 

It was ACP testing week. I was already having a rough morning since I had almost missed the bus. I was reviewing my information for the P.E. test for the third time, but I suppose I was just feeling a bit anxious. Ms. Tatum told us to put everything away and to get ready. She was starting to pass out the tests when my eye started itching. I couldn’t help but start to touch my eye. Soon Ms. Tatum handed me my test and I started immediately. I was taking my test and my eye wasn’t helping me at all. I was noticing that when I tried to open my eye, I couldn’t seen anything at all. Everything was a blur. For the remainder of the test I just put part of my hand on my eye to avoid any more problems seeing. Bottom line was that I ended up taking the test with one eye. When I was done with the test I went to the bathroom to go check what was going on. I checked myself in the mirror and I found that my contact had fallen out I got so scared. Just the thought of having to take my next test with one functioning eye, made me freak out.Where and when that contact fell out, I’ll never know. I went back to the classroom and told Ms. Tatum what happened. She had a little laugh and said “Oh, so that’s why you were touching your eye.” She asked me what I was going to do, and I decided to go inside the closet and call my mom to bring me my glasses. I prayed in my head she answered and when she did I told her everything. Luckily she was not on her way to work yet, and could bring me my glasses. When I finally got them, I was relieved. The whole situation made me think what would I do without my parents?”

-Giuliana Alcaraz

 

 

 

“I remember when I was younger, my mother and I, would go on the DART to downtown, Red Bird Mall, or my daycare. One time, when we went down Jefferson Street, I had on overalls and a striped shirt, eating a Bimbo donuts pack with my Winnie-the-poo backpack. All around me I remember seeing Paisanos on the bus ready to go to work. Women like my mother with their children, going to daycare, talking in Spanish, or half asleep, too tired to talk. Before getting on our bus we would wait at the Cockrell Hill Transfer Station early in the morning, around 5:45 or 6, to get to my mom’s English classes and my daycare on time. There was an officer there every single day waiting for me. She would always tell me to come in her office and she would give me a lollipop. After she handed me the lollipop, she would ask me how daycare was going and, with my little English, I told her that I learned how to count, or that I drew a nice picture. She never treated me like a little girl. She always took me seriously and never treated me less than because of my little English. Even my mom would try and talk to her with the little English she knew, and the woman would help her and my mother would do the same with her Spanish. I find this part of my life to be interesting because I was learning to translate at a young age for my mother and learning in a way human geography (shoutout to Ms. Smith), how Latinos come together and look out for each other in their communities.”

-Rosilda Amézquita

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